Brian Sing
+1 (310) 948-1643
Digital Product Designer
briansing.sunny@gmail.com


TMRW Specimen Management System → move lots of beacons  


TMRW SMS → Biorepository Ops



        This page reviews the twin set of features “Bulk Relocation” and “Bulk Validation”—a two pronged process to support TMRW’s commercial offsite storage Biorepository solution for clinics—through the lens of SMS Specimen Management System desktop web-app. This app is used by clinics to interact with storage robots (seen below).


1. context: Medium format automated cryostorage.


2. context: Large format automated cryostorage. 



3. Images (2) of Biorepository, Colorado, TMRW’s offsite storage solution. 
4. The Biorepository is a commercial offering for TMRW clients providing the range of ivfOS storage robots without them requiring the space. 

        By using existing robots as offsite storage, TMRW can circumvent demanding clinics to make the site-specific architectural interventions necessary to uphold larger CryoRobots. 



My Challenge:

Scale a one-at-a-time experience



5. image of TMRW’s specimen management system

        Though TMRW’s Specimen Management System is a robust web-based desktop app akin to a control center which interacts with Robots across the ivfOS ecosystem ​(including the two robots above), the entirety of the existing processing methods for cross-site movement is a 1-by-1 at a time process.

         Not accounting for the time-in-lab an embryologist would take collect specimens, initiating track-and-trace for moving 42 specimens (“creating a Relocation Ticket”) was recorded in testing to take about TWO HOURS.

       For a business predicated upon cryostorage, with instances of clients with over 2500 specimens, and the onus to initiate track-and-trace on the clients’ workflows, a 1-by-1 set-up-process would be impossible, essentially making partering with TMRW’s business unfeasable strictly a labor stance.




Thesis: Multi-create is faster than one at a time...




6. one CryoBeacon can hold a dozen of eggs

7. a CryoGrid can hold up to 49 CryoBeacons



A one at a time software flow that cannot keep up with the physical demand almost begs for interaction patterns like multiselect and filter-against-available-inventory.

We proposed this premise to a range of sample clinics who in turn advocated that these would solve a range of use cases. 




Screenshot (BEFORE) of the Previous “Create a Relocation Ticket” flow
and
Screenshot (AFTER) of the *New*  “Create a Relocation Ticket” flow using the same IxD patterns and components to trim the UX down while simultaneously allowing for exponentially greater revenue stream


<Context on data segmentation below, basically 50% bounce rate with 50% of those users going to details page to see which inventory was elligible>


Over 50% bounce rate of previous flow due to users returning to specimens details page for specific criteria. Our solution would allow them to search by the very criteria they were leaving the original flow for.

This in turn lead us to use that weakness as a strength, particularly using those clinic conversations to zero in on key details to use as search criteria. 




Iterating: ‘Mass Create’ 



 Creating ‘Relocation Tickets’ en mass (up to 98).

6. early stage Process Diagram

        As with all UX processes, especially here, “we are not our users.” As such, in our “sky-is-blue” first iteration, this process aspired towards the ideals our user-pool of embryologists set for themselves.


7. sketch of pre-creation confirmation screen


8. following design director’s instruction to use existing components to explore decisioning points

       Our design team put heavy emphasis on ensuring users had plenty of room to review their decisions. As designer №2, I executed all UIUX decisioning following the design director’s initial lead on this flow.

       However, as I contexutalized my bearings against embryology through extensive conversations with in-house as well as user-pool embryologists though, I eventually found this flow to be outside of the core of this embryology workflow, which was instead housed within a separate business’ digital experience of ‘electronic-medical-record’ (EMR) software.

9. screenshot of EMR interface highlighting problematic UI

       Among other process points, this heavily undermined the existing work, particularly as in many instances, for many of TMRW’s clinic-clients, operating through an EMR is an essential predefined part of the workflow.  

       
This insight begged for a pivot into a shorter and more flattened process.


       Over several months in tandem with hardware product teams, software developers, embryologists, this final flow was cut. As opposed to radio-button selection based off two search criteria, multiselect powered by robust search criteria curated through business needs took the fore.  This flow mirrors the existing one-at-a-time process but with an additional step for search and review.


10. finalized flow

No more multiview. Agile, number of search criteria limit, etc.


11. search and review 

12. various states for search and review

       In conclusion, through an interative process, we included an additional room for review, but limited it to one and not three screens, and included robust search functionality that could be stackable and exchangable in order to complement newfound speed with increased precisions lacking in the original one-at-a-time workflow.


  1. context: Medium format automated cryostorage.
  2. context: Large format automated cryostorage.
  3. Image of Colorado-location Biorepository, TMRW’s offsite storage solution.
  4. The Biorepository is a commercial offering for TMRW clients providing the range of ivfOS without them requiring the space.
  5. Image of TMRW’s specimen management system
  6. early stage of UX Process Diagram
  7. pre-creation confirmation screen
  8. following design director’s instruction to use existing components to explore decisioning points
  9. context: screenshot of EMR interface highlighting a problematic but required workflow some clients have to go through before this case study 
  10. finalized flow
  11. search and review

Anybody who keeps the ability to see beauty never grows old.




I believe that, in driving product design, form and function cannot be disentangled from users, our shared context, and each other. In this way, every great company that has truly succeeded before exemplifies this.
*